Podcast #77: Active Learning, Motivation, and Peer Assessment with Jose Vazquez

Podcast #77

Jose Vasquez has been teaching economics at the University of Illinois for 14 years. He teaches one of the largest introductory microeconomics classes in the world every semester with more than 900 students. He also teaches one of the biggest intro micro MOOC’s in the world: His Coursera course has had more than 100,000 students register in the last five years. He thinks deeply about how best to use his class time and what he wants students to do outside class. Our conversation covers a wide range as Jose explains what still excites him about teaching and how he got to where he is. We also talk about the joys of active learning, the importance of motivating our students, and the benefits (and costs) of peer assessment.

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Podcast #76: Applying Teaching Insights across Disciplines with Justin Cerenzia

Podcast #76

Justin Cerenzia teaches history at St George’s School in Middletown, Rhode Island. We don’t usually have guests from high schools on the show, but Justin is no ordinary high school teacher. He’s also the director of the school’s teaching center and someone who pays keen attention to research on pedagogy across the board. In this episode we talk to Justin about how teaching methods and ideas being popularized in STEM fields can translate to the humanities.

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Podcast #75: Classroom Observation with Marilyne Stains

Podcast #75

Outside observers can give instructors valuable formative feedback, and with the right observers and the right instruments, classroom observation can also be a useful (if incomplete) measure of teaching quality. Our guest, Marilyne Stains, teaches in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln where she specializes in chemical and science education. She has used a range of measures of instructor and student behavior in her research and recently co-authored the largest-ever study of STEM teaching practices that analyzed classroom observation data for more than 2,000 classes. In this episode, we discuss the pros and cons of a variety of classroom observation techniques from reliable objective measures like COPUS to completely unstructured note-taking.

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Math Time!

Math Time!

My DBER journal club recently read “A Mathematician’s Lament.” While I couldn’t attend the actual discussion, I really enjoyed the essay. The gist is that math is practical, but it can also be a creative art form, and this is completely ignored in the vast majority of K-12 math classes. Kids have no exposure to math as play beyond gamified drills of arithmetic facts. Working mathematicians on the other hand don’t just know a whole bunch of definitions and algorithms–They actively create and try to see a beautiful abstract world in ways no one has before. Mathematicians have a lot more in common with painters and sculptors than they do accountants or even engineers.

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Podcast #74: Engaged Learning with Monroe Weber-Shirk

Podcast #74

Monroe Weber-Shirk has taught engineering at Cornell for 24 years, and in 2005 he started the AguaClara Cornell program where he works closely with local partners, graduate students, and up to 80 undergraduates at a time. Together they develop, implement, and maintain sustainable water treatment facilities in multiple developing countries. It’s an incredible model of deeply engaged learning at scale, and in this episode Monroe tells us how it works and how he got here.

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Podcast #73: Teaching Physics Teachers with Mac Stetzer

Podcast #73

Mac Stetzer from the University of Maine Department of Physics and Astronomy is an active physics education researcher with lots of experience teaching teachers how to teach physics better. In this episode he shares his lessons learned working with undergraduate learning assistants, graduate student teaching assistants, and teachers at the K-12 level.

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Improvising a Third Stage

Improvising a Third Stage

After singing the praises of two stage exams a few weeks ago, I was dismayed when I saw the scores on our latest (two stage) midterm exam. Average individual scores were low (67), and while average group scores were higher (77), there was clearly a whole bunch of learning being left on the table. Luckily my teaching team is a creative bunch, and we improvised a successful third stage for the exam.

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